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Thursday, April 30, 2020 | History

6 edition of Suicide in Rabbinic literature found in the catalog.

Suicide in Rabbinic literature

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Published by Ktav Pub. House in Hoboken, NJ .
Written in

    Subjects:
  • Suicide -- Religious aspects -- Judaism.,
  • Suicide in rabbinical literature.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Sidney Goldstein.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHV6545 .G62 1989
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxvi, 128 p. ;
    Number of Pages128
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2037251M
    ISBN 10088125147X
    LC Control Number88013532

    Examining the facts of legal judgments through midrashic discussions of the law and evidence, Halberstam discovers that rabbinic understandings of the law were riddled with doubt and challenged the possibility of true justice. This book thoroughly engages law, narrative, and theology to explicate rabbinic legal authority and its limits. Introduction: The Talmud, Rabbinic Literature, and Jewish Culture TheBabylonianTalmud(Bavli)iswithoutdoubtthemost prominent text of rabbinic Judaism’s traditional literature. Indeed, the simple phrase “the Talmud says” often stands as a kind of shorthand for any teaching found anywhere in the vast rabbinic corpus surviving from. After years of advanced Yeshiva study in Toras Moshe and Mir, Jerusalem, I decided to attend American Jewish University in Los Angeles, completing a BA in .


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Suicide in Rabbinic literature by Goldstein, Sidney Rabbi. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Suicide in biblical and exegetical literature --Instances of suicide in the prophets, writings, and apocrypha --Suicide in talmudic literature --The definition of intentional suicide by talmudic commentators and codifiers --Exonerating circumstances with regard to suicide --Suicide as an act of martyrdom.

Responsibility: by Sidney Goldstein. Suicide in Rabbinic Literature Hardcover – March 1, by Sidney Goldstein (Author) See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Hardcover "Please retry" $ $ $ Hardcover, March 1, Author: Sidney Goldstein. Suicide in Rabbinic Literature Paperback – January 1, by Sidney Goldstein (Author) See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price New from Used from Hardcover "Please retry" $ $ $ Hardcover $ Author: Sidney Goldstein. Rabbinic literature, in its broadest sense, can mean the entire spectrum of rabbinic writings throughout Jewish history. However, the term often refers specifically to literature from the Talmudic era, as opposed to medieval and modern rabbinic writing, and thus corresponds with the Hebrew term Sifrut Chazal (Hebrew: ספרות חז״ל ‎ "Literature [of our] sages," where Hazal.

While there is no explicit biblical prohibition on suicide, later rabbinic authorities derived a prohibition from the verse in Genesis“And surely your blood of your lives, will I require.” Rashi and other early rabbinic authorities understood the verse as. The Babylonian Talmud, the most comprehensive body of rabbinic literature and a central text of Jewish civil and religious law, dates from the 2nd century b.c.

to its final redaction during the 5th and 6th centuries ic literature, including the Mishnah, the Babylonian and Palestinian (Jerusalem) Talmuds, and the various midrashic commentaries on the Hebrew.

This article is about Esther in rabbinic was the chief character in the Book of is counted among the prophetesses of Israel. Allusions in rabbinic literature to the Biblical story of Esther contain various expansions, elaborations and inferences beyond the text presented in the book of the Bible.

RABBINICAL LITERATURE, a modern scientific term used to describe the literature Suicide in Rabbinic literature book halakhah which is based upon the Oral Suicide in Rabbinic literature book, its traditions and methodology in its different periods, its changing languages, and its varied forms.

This definition excludes from its purview such sacred literature as liturgy, piyyutim, and other liturgical compositions, pure Kabbalah works. Views of suicide in classical Greece and Rome / A. Alvarez --Early Christian views on suicide / Georges Minois --Masada: an early instance of mass suicide / Flavius Josephus --Suicide is prohibited by Christian teaching / Augustine of Hippo --Suicide in the Old Testament and Rabbinic literature / Kalman Kaplan and Matthew Schwartz --Suicide is.

What follows is a guide to the basics of rabbinic literature for beginners as well as an insightful guide to the meaning of rabbinic literature for those who are already students.

The insight is due to the research and writing of Mark Washofsky. What I seek to do here is put it in a format that will help beginners and more advanced students alike. Because of its age and significance, the expository commentary on the book of Genesis [q.v., under Hebrew Bible] Bereshit Rabbah, commonly known in English as Genesis Rabbah, is considered to be of primary position in the Midrash, a collection of scriptural exegesis and commentary that is part of the larger body of rabbinic Talmudic literature.

The entire body of rabbinic literature (including Jewish liturgy) chronicles the attachment of the ancient rabbis to the Land of Israel. These texts are moving, engaging, and eventually set the stage for the modern return to the Land.

The rabbinic view of the Land is a continuation and outgrowth of the Biblical view. Allusions in rabbinic literature to the Biblical story of Daniel contain various expansions, elaborations and inferences beyond the text presented in the Book of stories are describing Jewish success in the Diaspora, where it was important to emphasize Jewish wisdom and statecraft during periods of foreign domination in order to strengthen the sense of worth.

This book draws on the whole spectrum of rabbinic literature, comparing its stories and explanations with folk beliefs of other cultures throughout the world. Sperber makes use of a wide range of resources - medieval and modern, legal, folkloristic, anthropological and literary - in his discussion of customs, proving that Jewish communities.

In Introduction to Rabbinic Literature, legendary author and teacher Jacob Neusner distills a lifetime of scholarship into the essence of what has been received from the book gives readers everything they need to know to understand rabbinic literature.

It explores the formative age and the forces that gave rise to rabbinic literature, and tells in a simple. It is surprising that Sidney Goldstein, in his recent book Suicide in Rabbinic Literature (Hoboken, ), makes no mention of this notion.

See also Avot de-Rabbi Nathan, chap. 36, which discusses those who lose their portion in the world-to-come. There is no mention here of suicide. AJS Review 18/2 (): The rabbis are as important today as they were two thousand years ago, at the dawn of the literature that came to be named after them.

The Mishnah, the Tosefta, the Talmuds, the collections of Midrash, and other writings ascribed to the ancient rabbis -- the oral Torah -- were gradually produced between the first and the seventh century of the Common Era/5(17).

Focus On Rabbinic Literature. Written by leading scholars, the Focus On essays are designed to stimulate thought and to explore in depth topics of interest in the field of Biblical studies. New essays on specific themes, with links to related content within the site for further reading, are published throughout the year.

Rabbinical literature definition is - the literature of Hebrew theology and philosophy including the Talmud and its exegesis. Introduction to Rabbinic Literature with Professor Azzan Yadin. This course will provide an overview of early rabbinic literature. In it, Professor Yadin discusses and reads passages from some of the texts that shaped rabbinic Judaism, particularly the Mishnah and the Talmud.

Rabbinic literature (and in many ways, rabbinic thinking) is grounded in the production and understanding of halakhah. Halakhah, which comes from a Hebrew word for walking, refers to Jewish legal decisions and law. It is these legal discussions that rabbinic literature is most concerned with. SALDARINE: New Testament and Rabbinic Literature broad strokes.

The Bible forbids work on the Sabbath, but does not specify in detail the nature of work. Second-Temple Jewish literature and society disputed over more specific norms for Sabbath obser- vance. For example, the Book of Jubilees and the Damascus DocumentFile Size: KB.

This site is a collection of links to Rabbinic primary texts, journals, dictionaries, and other study tools. Notice While the Library thinks that these sites are useful, their content is not under our control and may express views that are not shared by. ONLINE: Click on Read More and Buy from any book page on this site.

You will be redirected to JPS's publishing partner, the University of Nebraska Press. PHONE: Call Longleaf Services at or EMAIL: [email protected] FAX: OR EBOOKS: Most JPS books are available from ebook vendors. Tag Archive. Below you'll find a list of all posts that have been tagged as “Rabbinic Literature” Why Rabbinic Literature Is Pertinent to the Study of the Gospels.

Brad H. Young Apr30 Articles, Blog 1 Comment. The complete lecture is now accessible to JP users. View now. Rabbinic literature Filed under: Rabbinical literature The Babylonian Talmud in Selection (second edition; New York: Philosophical Library, ), ed. by. 'The King' is a very common refernce to God in Rabbinic literature, and the formulation in MRS, supports this understanding: 'When He will sit upon the throne of God, and there will be the war of God, at that time "the Lord will have war with Amalek" (Ex ), these are the words of Rabbi Joshua" The subject of the verb 'sit' is.

giants as described by rabbinic literature Giants in the Hebrew text are described as those “who ruined the world” (by their violence, (Enoch vii.

3, 4). These giants are descended from the fallen angels and the daughters of Adam. Suicide in Biblical, Talmudic and Rabbinic Writings; 0. Suicide in Biblical, Talmudic and Rabbinic Writings. Book Reviews. Jews and the Ecumenical Dialogue “Survey of Recent Halakhic Periodical Literature “Settlement in Israel”, “Delayed Burial”, “Sale of Commercial Enterprises to Sabbath Violators”, “The Agunah Problem.

Sidney Goldstein, Suicide in Rabbinic Literature in Critical Review of Books in Religion,pp. Ernest Martin, Secrets of Golgotha: The Forgotten History of Christ’s Crucifixion, in Critical Review of Books in Religion,p "With the publication of this volume, the Anchor Bible Reference Library achieves a landmark in the history of rabbinic literature and religion.

In Introduction to Rabbinic Literature, legendary author Jacob Neusner collects the essence of a lifetime of scholarship. In short, this book explores the formative age of rabbinic literature, and tells in a simple, straightforward way what. Posts about rabbinic literature written by willhartbrown.

Though publishedJon Levenson’s “Creation and the Persistence Evil: The Jewish Drama of Omnipotence” still breaths invigorating and lively words into the hearts and minds of modern readers who seek to understand Yahweh in the ancient context of creation.

This book is an attempt to formulate a methodology with which to approach rabbinic literature as a source for Jewish women’s history. It uses the rabbinic presentation of Rabbi Akiva’s wife as a paradigm that demonstrates the various approaches explored in the book.

by Yehoshua Kenaz about the suicide of a soldier. These chapters situate literary trends not only in the context of modern Zionism but within a longer Jewish textual tradition that includes bibli‐ cal and rabbinic texts as well as Yiddish literature and modern European literature that treat the topic of suicide.

Samson, who epitomizes both. Students in this concentration work to develop competencies in broad-ranging aspects of rabbinic literature. Study focuses on the historical development of rabbinic Judaism in its late-antique context as well as the various styles of rabbinic expression and rhetoric.

Students are trained in a variety of disciplinary approaches including literary and cultural criticism, as well. Theology in Rabbinic Stories book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. Students of rabbinic literature usually distinguish between t /5. contributed to the development of Post-Talmudic Rabbinic literature are mentioned, for such a listing would include thousands of names.

Those who are listed here were the most influential people, whose work has had a lasting effect on our understanding of Classical Jewish texts, Jewish law and thought. Underlying Philosophy and Theology of Rabbinic Midrashim and Quasi-Halakhot. Women’s Character: The Dinah Affair; Frymer-Kensky’s Theory; Rabbinic Conceptions of Men’s Character; Deducing the Theology and Philosophy Underlying Rabbinic Literature.

General Principles, Criteria, and PremisesAuthor: Paul Heger. Buy a cheap copy of Theology in Rabbinic Stories book by Chaim Pearl. Students of rabbinic literature usually distinguish between the legal content (halakhah) and the folkloric content (aggadah) of the Talmud and related writings.

Free shipping over $/5(3). rabbinic literature.7 In fact, this identification is made explicit in another passage in the Mekhilta,which follows a similar literary pattern: Eschatology, Violence, and Suicide: An Early Rabbinic Theme and its Influence in the Middle Ages Adiel Schremer.

In the Second Book of Maccabees (II Maccabees, Chapter 7) a story is told of a (nameless) mother of seven who was arrested with her sons for defying the decree of the Seleucid monarch to transgress the commandments of the Torah she-bi-khetav: Lit.

"the written Torah." The Bible; the Pentateuch; Tanakh (the Pentateuch, Prophets and Hagiographia)Torah. Rabbinic literature includes a substantial discussion of foreign holidays, their prohibitions, and their origins. These holidays and their descriptions are predominately found in the rabbinic tractate ʿAvodah Zarah, which forbids rabbinic Jews from interacting economically with non-Jews three days before a foreign festival (M.

AZ ) and Author: Catherine Bonesho.Posts about rabbinic literature written by jamesbradfordpate. J.B. Lightfoot. The Gospel of St.

John: A Newly Discovered Commentary.